Gran Cenote

Gran Cenote is only 10 min drive from Tulum city center. It’s an awesome beginners cenote as it is not large, easily accessible, not expensive. The water is relatively warm, you don’t need a wetsuit. They have lockers, however, we had our waterproof pockets for valuable stuff that we swam with. You can either rent a snorkeling kit or bring your own to be able to see stalactites and stalagmites, and small fishes. We had our own swimming goggles and that was more than enough. They also have hammocks and areas for relaxation. Note, that you need to pay with cash almost all entrance fees in Mexico.

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

Gran Cenote, Tulum

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Ruins of Tulum
Day 8

Ruins of Tulum

Tulum was one of the last cities built by Maya. Its main purpose was sea trade. There are multiple buildings in the complex, however, the most outstanding is the castle standing on a 12-meter cliff and overlooking the Caribbean sea. There is also an access to the beach so you can refresh during the hot day and go back to exploring the ruins 🙂

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

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Gran Cenote
Day 8

Day 7: Tulum, Gran Cenote, Playa Paraiso

In the morning we headed towards the Ruins of Tulum and made a stop next to the nearest Starbucks for our morning coffee. Since it was already very crowded it was the closest parking available too. There is a tram going from Starbucks to the ruins, many shops, and restaurants and there is also a square where we witnessed the Danza de los Voladores or the Dance of the Flyers. It is an ancient ritual when 4 dancers descend to the ground tied with ropes. The fifth participant dances on top of a 30-meter pole.  It is believed that performing this ritual will ask the gods to end a drought.

Tulum

Tulum

Tulum

Ruins of Tulum

Please follow the links below to see more information about the ruins and Gran Cenote:

We spent the rest of our day in Playa Paraiso. There is only one road going there and there was a terrible traffic jam. If we knew that in advance we would just walk. There are parking areas along the road or multiple beach restaurants offer free parking if you have a drink.

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum  Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

Playa Paraiso, Tulum

A well-deserved relaxation after a long day 🙂

Tulum

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Day 8

10 Days in Mexico: Mexico City, Cancun, Tulum and Much More

Flight: San Diego -> Mexico City -> Cancun -> Mexico City -> San Diego
CancunDuration: 10 days
Mileage: ~350 in Yucatán area
Starting point: Mexico City
Countries: Mexico
Budget for 2 people: $2930 ($1500 flights, $215 hotels*, $275 car rental, $125 gas and taxis, $50 buses, $420 food, $90 tickets, $140 snorkeling, $115 airport parking)

  • Day 1: fly to Mexico City, visit Museo Nacional de Antropología
  • Day 2: explore Chapultepec park, dinner with local family
  • Day 3: visit Teotihuacan, explore CDMX Zócalo
  • Day 4: visit Tepoztlán
  • Day 5: explore CDMX Xochimilco
  • Day 6: fly to Cancun, drive to Chichén Itzá, swim in Ik Kil cenotes, drive to Tulum and enjoy local food

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